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Do butterfly wing patterns really mimic predator eyes?


July 23rd, 2014         by BBC News - Science & Environment

Do butterfly wing patterns really mimic predator eyes? Continue reading ...

Row over ‘bonkers’ EU energy plan


July 22nd, 2014         by BBC News - Science & Environment

EU commissioners meet today to agree an energy savings target for 2030 amid serious disagreement about how ambitious it should be. Continue reading ...

Electronic Arts earnings surge 51%


July 22nd, 2014         by BBC News - Technology

US video game publisher Electronic Arts reports a 51% jump in profit for the April-to-June quarter, boosted by strong sales of titles like Titanfall and FIFA 2014. Continue reading ...

Dream Cars: Innovative Design, Visionary Ideas


July 22nd, 2014         by BBC News - Science & Environment

Models and conceptual drawings by famous car manufacturers Continue reading ...

Fly on the Facebook wall documentary


July 22nd, 2014         by BBC News - Technology

How to make a documentary in the social media age Continue reading ...

Microsoft profit falls on Nokia loss


July 22nd, 2014         by BBC News - Technology

Technology giant Microsoft reports a 7% fall in profits to $4.6bn in the second quarter, hit by a $692m loss at its newly-acquired Nokia handset division. Continue reading ...

Apple earnings up on iPhone sales


July 22nd, 2014         by BBC News - Technology

Apple reports quarterly profits of $7.75bn up 12%, helped by strong sales of its iPhone. Continue reading ...

Safeguarding Belize’s barrier reef with conservation drones


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seeking to gain a high-tech edge over illegal fishers, the Government of Belize will use “eyes in the sky” to enforce fishing regulations in the biodiverse Glover’s Reef Marine Reserve and other reef systems in what is the first use of conservation drones to monitor marine protected areas. Continue reading ...

More Schizophrenia-Related Variants


July 22nd, 2014         by The Scientist RSS

The latest genome-wide search for genetic variants tied to the psychiatric disorder triples the number of candidates. Continue reading ...

Vulnerability of sharks as collateral damage in commercial fishing shown by study


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new study that examined the survival rates of 12 different shark species when captured as unintentional bycatch in commercial longline fishing operations found large differences in survival rates across the 12 species, with bigeye thresher, dusky, and scalloped hammerhead being the most vulnerable. Continue reading ...

Extra exercise helps depressed smokers kick the habit faster


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

People diagnosed with depression need to step out for a cigarette twice as often as smokers who are not dealing with a mood disorder. And those who have the hardest time shaking off the habit may have more mental health issues than they are actually aware of, research suggests. While nearly one in five North American adults are regular smokers, a figure that continues to steadily decline, about 40 per cent of depressed people are in need of a regular drag. Continue reading ...

Are state Medicaid policies sentencing people with mental illnesses to prison?


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A link between Medicaid policies on antipsychotic drugs and incarceration rates for schizophrenic individuals has been uncovered by a new study. Researchers found that states requiring prior authorization for atypical antipsychotics had less serious mental illness overall but higher shares of inmates with psychotic symptoms than the national average. The study concluded that prior authorization of atypical antipsychotics was associated with a 22 percent increase in the likelihood of imprisonment, compared with the likelihood in a state without such a requirement. Continue reading ...

Therapeutic bacteria prevent obesity in mice, study finds


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A probiotic that prevents obesity could be on the horizon. Bacteria that produce a therapeutic compound in the gut inhibit weight gain, insulin resistance and other adverse effects of a high-fat diet in mice, investigators have discovered. Regulatory issues must be addressed before moving to human studies, but the findings suggest that it may be possible to manipulate the bacterial residents of the gut -- the gut microbiota -- to treat obesity and other chronic diseases. Continue reading ...

Preschoolers can reflect on what they don’t know


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Contrary to previous assumptions, researchers find that preschoolers are able to gauge the strength of their memories and make decisions based on their self-assessments. The findings contribute to research on the reliability of children's eyewitness testimony in a court of law, and they carry important implications for educational practices. "Previous emphasis on the development of metacognition during middle childhood has influenced education practices," says an author. "Now we know that some of these ideas may be adapted to meet preschoolers' learning needs." Continue reading ...

Enhanced instrument enables high-speed chemical imaging of tissues


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A research team has demonstrated a dramatically improved technique for analyzing biological cells and tissues based on characteristic molecular vibrations. The new technique is an advanced form of Raman spectroscopy that is fast and accurate enough to create high-resolution images of biological specimens, with detailed spatial information on specific biomolecules, at speeds fast enough to observe changes in living cells. Continue reading ...

Vitamin D deficiency raises risk of schizophrenia diagnosis


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vitamin D-deficient individuals are twice as likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia as people who have sufficient levels of the vitamin, according to a new study. Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium and is needed for bone and muscle health. The skin naturally produces this vitamin after exposure to sunlight. People also obtain smaller amounts of the vitamin through foods, such as milk fortified with vitamin D. More than 1 billion people worldwide are estimated to have deficient levels of vitamin D due to limited sunshine exposure. Continue reading ...

High-salt diet doubles threat of cardiovascular disease in people with diabetes


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

People with Type 2 diabetes who eat a diet high in salt face twice the risk of developing cardiovascular disease as those who consume less sodium, according to a new study. Diabetes occurs when there is too much sugar in the bloodstream. People develop Type 2 diabetes when their bodies become resistant to the hormone insulin, which carries sugar from the blood to cells. Continue reading ...

African elephant genome suggests they are superior smellers


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sense of smell is critical for survival in many mammals. In a new study, researchers examined the olfactory receptor repertoire encoded in 13 mammalian species and found that African elephants have the largest number of OR genes ever characterized; more than twice that found in dogs, and five times more than in humans. Continue reading ...

3-D-printed tissues advance stem cell research


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A tissue engineering and vascular biology expert recently won a Faculty Early Career Development Award for his work on 3D tissue printing, and its contribution of the advancement of stem cell research. Continue reading ...

When will we take honey seriously?


July 22nd, 2014         by BBC Nature - Features

When will we take medicinal honey seriously? Continue reading ...

Ultrasonically propelled nanorods spin dizzyingly fast


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vibrate a solution of rod-shaped metal nanoparticles in water with ultrasound and they'll spin around their long axes like tiny drill bits. Why? No one yet knows exactly. But researchers have clocked their speed -- and it's fast. At up to 150,000 revolutions per minute, ten times faster than any nanorotor ever reported. Continue reading ...

Technique simplifies creation of high-tech crystals


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Highly purified crystals that split light with uncanny precision are key parts of high-powered lenses, specialized optics and, potentially, computers that manipulate light instead of electricity. But producing these crystals by current techniques, such as etching them with a precise beam of electrons, is often extremely difficult and expensive. Now, researchers have proposed a new method that could allow scientists to customize and grow these specialized materials, known as photonic crystals, with relative ease. Continue reading ...

Quantum leap in lasers brightens future for quantum computing


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists have devised a breakthrough laser that uses a single artificial atom to generate and emit particles of light. The laser may play a crucial role in the development of quantum computers, which are predicted to eventually outperform today's most powerful supercomputers. Continue reading ...

How children categorize living things


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

"Name everything you can think of that is alive." How would a child respond to this question? Would his or her list be full of relatives, animals from movies and books, or perhaps neighborhood pets? Would the poppies blooming on the front steps make the list or the oak tree towering over the backyard? The children's responses in a recent study revealed clear convergences among distinct communities but also illuminated differences among them. Continue reading ...

Radio frequency ID tags on honey bees reveal hive dynamics


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists attached radio-frequency identification tags to hundreds of individual honey bees and tracked them for several weeks. The effort yielded two discoveries: Some foraging bees are much busier than others; and if those busy bees disappear, others will take their place. Continue reading ...

Understanding how neuro cells turn cancerous


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New research, for the first time, brings scientists nearer to understanding how some cells in the brain and nervous system become cancerous. The team studied a tumor suppressor called Merlin. Their results have identified a new mechanism whereby Merlin suppresses tumors, and that the mechanism operates within the nucleus. The research team has discovered that unsuppressed tumor cells increase via a core signalling system, the hippo pathway, and they have identified the route and method by which this signalling occurs. Continue reading ...

Communication between nostril/skin microbiome bacteria can influence pathogen behavior


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists have made an important discovery about the molecular interactions that occur between generally benign species of Propionibacterium bacteria and the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, the cause of most 'staph' infections. Continue reading ...

Report on viruses looks beyond disease


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In contrast to their negative reputation as disease causing agents, some viruses can perform crucial biological and evolutionary functions that help to shape the world we live in today, according to a new report. "Viruses participate in essential Earth processes and influence all life forms on the planet, from contributing to biogeochemical cycles, shaping the atmospheric composition, and driving major speciation events," states one researcher. Continue reading ...

The heart of an astronaut, five years on


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The heart of an astronaut is a much-studied thing. Scientists have analyzed its blood flow, rhythms, atrophy and, through journal studies, even matters of the heart. But for the first time, researchers are looking at how oxidative stress and inflammation caused by the conditions of space flight affect those hearts for up to five years after astronauts fly on the International Space Station. Lessons learned may help improve cardiovascular health on Earth as well. Continue reading ...

NASA’s HS3 mission spotlight: The HIRAD instrument


July 22nd, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer, known as HIRAD, will fly aboard one of two unmanned Global Hawk aircraft during NASA's Hurricane Severe Storm Sentinel or HS3 mission from Wallops beginning August 26 through September 29. One of the NASA Global Hawks will cover the storm environment and the other will analyze inner-storm conditions. HIRAD will fly aboard the inner-storm Global Hawk and will be positioned at the bottom, rear section of the aircraft. Continue reading ...