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Scientists Solve Giant Sperm Paradox

A study reveals why some male fruit flies produce sex cells that are 20 times the length of their bodies. Continue reading ...

Biotech Sponsors Science Competition

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals takes over from Intel as the sponsor of the Science Talent Search. Continue reading ...

Highest capacity Atlantic cable planned

Microsoft and Facebook announce plans to build the highest capacity data link between the US and Europe. Continue reading ...

How do you kill a malaria parasite? Clog it with cholesterol

Drexel scientists have discovered an unusual mechanism for how two antimalarial drugs kill Plasmodium parasites. Amidst growing concerns about drug resistance, these findings could help to develop more effective drugs against the disease. Continue reading ...

Early-life stress causes digestive problems and anxiety in rats

Traumatic events early in life can increase levels of norepinephrine -- the primary hormone responsible for preparing the body to react to stressful situations -- in the gut, increasing the risk of developing chronic indigestion and anxiety during adulthood, a new study reports. Continue reading ...

First discovery in United States of colistin resistance in a human E. coli infection

The Multidrug Resistant Organism Repository and Surveillance Network at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research characterized a transferrable gene for colistin resistance in the United States that may herald the emergence of truly pan-drug resistant bacteria. Continue reading ...

Doubling down on Schrödinger’s cat

Physicists have given Schrödinger's famous cat a second box to play in, and the result may help further the quest for reliable quantum computing. Continue reading ...

Targeting metals to fight pathogenic bacteria

Researchers have discovered a unique system of acquisition of essential metals in the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. This research represents a new potential target for the design of antibiotics. Continue reading ...

Evidence of ice age at Martian north pole

Using radar data scientists found evidence of an ice age recorded in the polar deposits of Mars. Ice ages on Mars are driven by processes similar to those responsible for ice ages on Earth, that is, long-term cyclical changes in the planet's orbit and tilt, which affect the amount of solar radiation it receives at each latitude. Continue reading ...

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development. Continue reading ...

Quantifying Consciousness

Overall brain metabolic rate can distinguish between pathological states of human consciousness, a study shows. Continue reading ...

Another reason to stay active as we age

Researchers found that individuals who maintain an active jogging habit into their senior years are spending nearly the same amount of metabolic energy as a 20-year-old. Continue reading ...

Brain picks up the beat of music automatically

A sense of rhythm is a uniquely human characteristic. Music cognition scientists discovered that the sense of rhythm – also known as the beat – is so fundamental to humans that we recognize patterns in music even without paying any attention or receiving any training. Continue reading ...

Global warming: Spring snow a no-go?

Spring snowpack, relied on by ski resorts and water managers throughout the Western United States, may be more vulnerable to a warming climate in coming decades, according to a new study. Continue reading ...

Astronomers find giant planet around very young star

In contradiction to the long-standing idea that larger planets take longer to form, astronomers have announced the discovery of a giant planet in close orbit around a star so young that it still retains a disk of circumstellar gas and dust. Continue reading ...

Using a model to estimate breast cancer risk in effort to improve prevention

A model developed to estimate the absolute risk of breast cancer suggests that a 30-year-old white woman in the United States has an 11.3 percent risk, on average, of developing invasive breast cancer by the age of 80, according to a new study. Continue reading ...

Researchers show experience plays strong role in early stages of brain circuit development

A new study suggests that external stimulation guides certain neurons' early development so that inhibitory neurons split into two different types of neurons, each with a different job, adding another level of complexity and regulation to the brain's circuitry. Continue reading ...

Why malnutrition is an immune disorder

Malnourished children are most likely to die from common infections, not starvation. New experimental evidence indicates that even with a healthy diet, defects in immune system function from birth could contribute to a malnourished state throughout life. Researchers speculate that targeting immune pathways could be a new approach to reduce the poor health and mortality caused by under- and overnutrition. Continue reading ...

Cuing environmental responses in fungi

Sensory perception lies at the heart of adaptation to changing conditions, and helps fungi to improve growth and recycle organic waste, and to know when and how to infect a plant or animal host. New results based on characterizing and then conducting a comparative analysis of two genome sequences shed new light on the evolution of sensory perception in fungi. Continue reading ...

Harbour porpoises are skilled hunters and eat almost constantly

Harbour porpoises have sometimes been described as 'living in the fast lane.' Being smaller than other cetaceans and living in cold northern waters means that the porpoises require a lot of energy to survive, making them prone to starvation. Now researchers have monitored harbour porpoises in the wild with tiny computers attached to them by suction cups show that the animals hunt and eat almost constantly. Continue reading ...

Scientists discover mechanism that turns mutant cells into aggressive cancers

Scientists have caught a cancer-causing mutation in the act. A new study shows how a gene mutation found in several human cancers, including leukemia, gliomas and melanoma, promotes the growth of aggressive tumors. Continue reading ...

How researchers make a battery in seven easy steps

Learn how researchers assemble experimental batteries. Continue reading ...

Exploring the rise and fall of alcohol-related mortality in Scotland: Affordability

The rise and fall of alcohol-related mortality in Scotland is partly due to changes in affordability, according to recent reports. Continue reading ...

Researchers identify critical factors that determine drought vulnerability of wheat, maize

Researchers have identified critical information about the environmental variables and agronomic factors that determine the vulnerability of maize and wheat production to drought. Continue reading ...

Party on(line): The link between social media, alcohol use

One of the undeniable powers of social media is its ability to influence people and their behaviors. This is especially true, a study finds, when it comes to alcohol use. Researchers found that when participants in a study were exposed to ads touting beer, as opposed to those selling bottled water, they were more inclined to consider drinking alcohol. Continue reading ...

Mothers’ parenting stress impacts both parents’ sexual satisfaction

First-time parents are only somewhat satisfied with their sex lives according to health researchers who checked in with parents regularly after their baby was born. And one factor that appears to be reducing their sexual satisfaction is mothers' stress as a new parent. Continue reading ...

Researchers link gene expression patterns of normal tissue to breast cancer prognosis

Researchers have identified a particular gene expression pattern in normal-appearing breast tissue around tumors that was linked to lower 10-year survival rates for women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Continue reading ...

Unmet surgical needs high for world’s 60 million refugees

The world’s estimated 60 million refugees, displaced from their homes due to conflict, persecution or human rights violations, may need at least 2.78 million surgeries a year, something thought to be very difficult to arrange in the midst of their upheaval. Continue reading ...

Practice less and play like a pro, say researchers

Visually guided videos could revolutionize coaching, say researchers. Watching videos that point to crucial details such as how golfers line up the ball, position their feet and twist their hips, significantly cuts the time it takes to master the skill, their report says. Continue reading ...

Bright lights, healthy choices

Dining in dimly lit restaurants has been linked to eating slowly and ultimately eating less than in brighter restaurants, but does lighting also impact how healthfully we order? A new research study suggests that it does. Continue reading ...