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Image of the Day: Bungee Nerves

Rorqual whales have unusually stretchy neurons in their mouths and tongues that allow the animals to feed by filtering gulps of water greater than the volumes of their bodies. Continue reading ...

Director Joss Whedon quits Twitter

Director Joss Whedon deletes his Twitter account, following criticism of his latest film, Age of Ultron. Continue reading ...

Gym fall killed Silicon Valley boss

The Silicon Valley entrepreneur and SurveyMonkey chief executive Dave Goldberg died of severe head trauma, according to local officials. Continue reading ...

How our view of what makes us happy has changed in 80 years

Our view of what makes us happy has changed markedly since 1938. That is the conclusion of the psychologist who has recreated a famous study of happiness conducted in Bolton in 1938. Continue reading ...

Digoxin increases the risk of early death in patients with heart problems, large study shows

There is conflicting evidence about whether digoxin, a drug that has been used worldwide for centuries to treat heart disease, might contribute to an increase in deaths in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) or congestive heart failure (CHF). Now, the largest review of all the evidence to date shows that it is associated with an increased risk of death in these patients, particularly in those being treated for AF. Continue reading ...

Taking Africa’s jobseekers online

Getting Africa's jobseekers online and into employment Continue reading ...

‘Fuzzy thinking’ in depression, bipolar disorder: New research finds effect is real

People with depression or bipolar disorder often feel their thinking ability has gotten “fuzzy”, or less sharp than before their symptoms began. Now, researchers have shown in a large study that effect is indeed real – and rooted in brain activity differences that show up on advanced brain scans. Continue reading ...

Prominent Cell Biologist Dies

Cytoskeleton specialist Alan Hall was best known for unpacking the roles of Rho GTPases.    Continue reading ...

Outsmarting HIV

Small molecules that mimic the T-cell surface receptor CD4 could expose the virus to antibody-based immune responses. Continue reading ...

Shale-drilling additives in drinking-water taps near leak, new technique shows

Substances commonly used for drilling or extracting Marcellus shale gas foamed from the drinking water taps of three Pennsylvania homes near a reported well-pad leak, according to new analysis from a team of scientists. Continue reading ...

Study finds inhibitor for COPD lung destruction

Newly published observations in patients and experiments in mice provide evidence that cigarette smoke reduces expression of the protein NLRX1 in the lung, taking the restraints off a destructive immune response that results in COPD. The researchers hope that pinpointing the protein's role could lead to improved COPD risk assessment, diagnostics, and treatment. Continue reading ...

Racial differences in male breast cancer outcomes

While black and white men under age 65 diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer received similar treatment, blacks had a 76 percent higher risk of death than whites, research shows. Male breast cancer is a rare disease, accounting for less than 1% of all cancers in men and approximately 2% of all breast cancers in the United States. Black men have a higher incidence of breast cancer and are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer at a younger age than their white counterparts. Continue reading ...

Primary care visits available to most uninsured, but at a high price

Uninsured people in the United States don't have any more difficulty getting appointments with primary care doctors than those with insurance, but they get them at prices that are likely unaffordable to a typical uninsured person, according to new research. Continue reading ...

Bystander CPR helps cardiac arrest survivors return to work

In Denmark, more bystanders performing CPR contributed to more cardiac arrest survivors returning to work, a study concludes. Cardiac arrest is the abrupt loss of heart function in a person who may or may not have diagnosed heart disease. The time and mode of death are unexpected. It occurs instantly or shortly after symptoms appear. Continue reading ...

New link between diabetes, Alzheimer’s found

A unique connection between diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease has been uncovered by researchers, providing further evidence that a disease that robs people of their memories may be affected by elevated blood sugar. Continue reading ...

Dietary supplements are good for coral health, study shows

Most people know the health benefits of taking daily supplements, but what about endangered corals? A new study has found that the critically endangered Staghorn coral may benefit from supplemental nutrition to mitigate the adverse impacts of global climate change. Continue reading ...

Real stereotypes continue to exist in virtual worlds

Stereotypes related to gender and appearance that burden women in the real world could follow them into virtual ones, according to researchers. In a study of how people interacted with avatars in an online game, women received less help from fellow players than men when they operated an unattractive avatar and when they used a male avatar. Continue reading ...

Bat disease: Scientists identify tissue-degrading enzyme in white-nose syndrome

Scientists have figured out the likely way that white-nose syndrome breaks down tissue in bats, opening the door to potential treatments for a disease that has killed more than six million bats since 2006 and poses a threat to the agricultural industry. Continue reading ...

Biologists shines light on origin of bioluminescence

Bioluminescence at least in one millipede may have evolved as a way to survive in a hot, dry environment, not as a means to ward off predators, according to scientists. Continue reading ...

Premature birth alters brain connections

Premature birth can alter the connectivity between key areas of the brain, according to a new study. The findings should help researchers to better understand why premature birth is linked to a greater risk of neurodevelopmental problems, including autistic spectrum disorders and attention deficit disorders. Continue reading ...

As the river rises: Cahokia’s emergence and decline linked to Mississippi River flooding

As with rivers, civilizations across the world rise and fall. Sometimes, the rise and fall of rivers has something to do with it. At Cahokia, the largest prehistoric settlement in the Americas north of Mexico, new evidence suggests that major flood events in the Mississippi River valley are tied to the cultural center's emergence and ultimately, to its decline. Continue reading ...

Researchers ‘un-can’ the HIV virus

If the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a bit like a hermetically sealed tin, can no one has yet been able to break open. The good news is that researchers have now identified a way to use a "can opener" to force the virus to open up and to expose its vulnerable parts, allowing the immune system cells to then kill the infected cells. Continue reading ...

Scientists dramatically improve method for finding common genetic alterations in tumors

Scientists have developed a significantly better computer tool for finding genetic alterations that play an important role in many cancers but were difficult to identify with whole-genome sequencing. The tool is an algorithm called CONSERTING, short for Copy Number Segmentation by Regression Tree in Next Generation Sequencing. Continue reading ...

Double-digit growth for firms creating own online communities

Double-digit revenue growth has been observed for firms that create their own brand-specific online communities. Engaging consumers through online social networks is an increasingly mission-critical activity for major brands. While some firms host their own brand-centric online communities, Facebook has become the dominant host for online communities of brand enthusiasts, taking over $10 billion and 10% of U.S. digital advertising spending in 2014. Continue reading ...

New climate projections paint bleak future for tropical coral reefs

As greater atmospheric carbon dioxide boosts sea temperatures, tropical corals face a bleak future. New climate model projections show that conditions are likely to increase the frequency and severity of coral disease outbreaks, reports a team of researchers. Continue reading ...

Chicxulub and the deccan eruptions: Just a coincidence?

Scientists have addressed the 'uncomfortably close' occurrence of the Chicxulub impact in the Yucatan and the most voluminous phase of the Deccan Traps flood basalt eruptions in India. Specifically, the researchers argue that the impact likely triggered most of the immense eruptions of lava in India -- that indeed, this was not a coincidence, but a cause-and-effect relationship. Continue reading ...

Recurrence of prostate cancer detected earlier with innovative PSMA-ligand PET/CT

A recent study compared use of the novel Ga-68-PSMA-ligand PET/CT with other imaging methods and found that it had substantially higher detection rates of prostate-specific membrane antigen in patients with biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. It is especially noteworthy that this hybrid PSMA-ligand identified a large number of positive findings in the clinically important range of low PSA-values. Continue reading ...

Cellular bubbles used to deliver Parkinson’s meds directly to brain

Exosomes could help with longstanding medical issues from cancer diagnosis to sophisticated research tool. Now, they could potentially help with delivering potent antioxidants into the brain of Parkinson's patients. Continue reading ...

Combining computer vision, brain computer interface for faster mine detection

Computer scientists have combined sophisticated computer vision algorithms and a brain-computer interface to find mines in sonar images of the ocean floor. The study shows that the new method speeds detection up considerably, when compared to existing methods -- mainly visual inspection by a mine detection expert. Continue reading ...

Puget Sound’s clingfish could inspire better medical devices, whale tags

Researchers are looking at how the biomechanics of clingfish could be helpful in designing devices and instruments to be used in surgery and even to tag and track whales in the ocean. Clingfish are considered one of the world's best suction cups, scientists say. Continue reading ...