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Peru probes 500 sea lion deaths


November 23rd, 2014         by BBC News - Science & Environment

Peru's environmental police launch an investigation into the deaths of some 500 sea lions found on a northern beach. Continue reading ...

New computer spying bug discovered


November 23rd, 2014         by BBC News - Technology

Computer security firm Symantec discovers what it says is one of the most sophisticated pieces of malicious software ever seen. Continue reading ...

New web data powers plan for police


November 23rd, 2014         by BBC News - Technology

A law forcing communications firms to keep details that could help identify criminals using the internet is being planned by the home secretary. Continue reading ...

Fish and chips ‘harming’ eider ducks


November 22nd, 2014         by BBC News - Science & Environment

Eider ducks on Northumberland's coastal areas are being harmed by people feeding them fish and chips and bread, a wildlife expert warns. Continue reading ...

How the hummingbird achieves its aerobatic feats


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Although hummingbirds are much larger and stir up the air more violently as they move, the way that they fly is more closely related to flying insects than it is to other birds. Now, the most detailed, three-dimensional aerodynamic simulation of hummingbird flight conducted to date has definitively demonstrated that the hummingbird achieves its nimble aerobatic abilities through a unique set of aerodynamic forces that are more closely aligned to those found in flying insects than to other birds. Continue reading ...

Theater arts research offers insight for designers, builders of social robots


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers have provided insight into human behavior for scientists, engineers who design and build social robots. Continue reading ...

Rejecting unsuitable suitors is easier said than done


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rejecting unsuitable romantic partners is easy in hypothetical situations, but not so when considering a face-to-face proposition, a new study shows. “When actually faced with a potential date, we don't like to reject a person and make them feel bad, which is not necessarily something that people anticipate when they imagine making these choices,” says the study’s lead researcher. Continue reading ...

New terahertz device could strengthen security


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

We are all familiar with the security hassles that accompany air travel. Now a new type of security detection that uses terahertz radiation is looking to prove its promise. Researchers have developed a room temperature, compact, tunable terahertz source that could lead to advances in homeland security and space exploration. Able to detect explosives, chemical agents and dangerous biological substances from safe distances, devices using terahertz waves could make public spaces more secure than ever. Continue reading ...

Self-regulation intervention boosts school readiness of at-risk children, study shows


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An intervention that uses music and games to help preschoolers learn self-regulation skills is helping prepare at-risk children for kindergarten, a new study shows. Self-regulation skills -- the skills that help children pay attention, follow directions, stay on task and persist through difficulty -- are critical to a child's success in kindergarten and beyond, said a co-author of the new study. Continue reading ...

Anti-HIV medicines can cause damage to fetal hearts, research shows


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New research raises concern about potential long-term harmful impact of 'antiretroviral therapy' on in-utero infants whose mothers are HIV-positive, but who are not infected with HIV themselves. The study shows that while the HIV medications have been successful in helping to prevent the transmission of the virus from mother to infant, they are associated with persistently impaired development of heart muscle and reduced heart performance in non-HIV-infected children whose mothers received the medicines years earlier. Continue reading ...

In landmark study of cell therapy for heart attack, more cells make a difference


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Physicians from 60 sites treated 161 heart attack patients with their own bone marrow cells, selected for their healing potential and then reinjected into the heart, in an effort to improve the heart's recovery. Their conclusion? Patients who receive more cells get significant benefits. Continue reading ...

Digoxin associated with higher risk of death, hospitalization, study shows


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Digoxin, a drug commonly used to treat heart conditions, was associated with a 71 percent higher risk of death and a 63 percent higher risk of hospitalization among adults with diagnosed atrial fibrillation and no evidence of heart failure, according to a study. Continue reading ...

‘Mind the gap’ between atomically thin materials


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For the first time, researchers have grown a single atomic layer of tungsten diselenide on a one- atom-thick substrate of graphene with pristine interfaces between the two layers using an industrially scalable technique. Continue reading ...

VIDEO: Twitter co-founder defends application


November 21st, 2014         by BBC News - Technology

The chairman and co-founder of Twitter is in London for the global launch of his new company 'Square'. Continue reading ...

Next-door leopards: First GPS-collar study reveals how leopards live with people


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In the first-ever GPS-based study of leopards in India, biologists have delved into the secret lives of these big cats, and recorded their strategies to thrive in human-dominated areas. Continue reading ...

Helping trains take the strain


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The introduction of smartcard ticketing for Singapore’s public transport system has enabled researchers to provide valuable predictive data on potential train overloading. This will enable system planners to address critical bottlenecks as the system stretches to accommodate an expanding population. Continue reading ...

A green transformation for pharmaceuticals


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A more sustainable approach to a bond-forming reaction extensively used in the pharmaceutical and fine chemical industries has now been developed. The team used the solvent-free, catalytic reaction to produce high yields of a wide range of amides, including the antidepressant moclobemide and other drug-like molecules. Continue reading ...

Fluorescent nanoprobe could become a universal, noninvasive method to identify and monitor tumors


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers have developed a hybrid metal-polymer nanoparticle that lights up in the acidic environment surrounding tumor cells. Nonspecific probes that can identify any kind of tumor are extremely useful for monitoring the location and spread of cancer and the effects of treatment, as well as aiding initial diagnosis. Continue reading ...

Google tries ad-free net experiment


November 21st, 2014         by BBC News - Technology

Search giant Google has unveiled an experiment that lets people pay to visit sites rather than see adverts. Continue reading ...

Marker polyps do not cause cancer, experts say


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Although serrated polyps usually are associated with colorectal cancer, it turns out that such polyps are themselves not dangerous, according to a study. Continue reading ...

Streamlining thin film processing for electrodes, display screens


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Energy storage devices and computer screens may seem worlds apart, but they’re not. When an electrical engineering professor teamed up with and computer scientists to make a less expensive supercapacitor for storing renewable energy, they developed a new plasma technology that will streamline the production of display screens. Continue reading ...

Robots face new creativity test


November 21st, 2014         by BBC News - Technology

A US professor is proposing a successor to the famous Turing test devised to spot when artificial intelligence becomes "human". Continue reading ...

Nail stem cells prove more versatile than press ons


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

There are plenty of body parts that don't grow back when you lose them. Nails are an exception, and a new study reveals some of the reasons why. A team of researchers has identified a new population of nail stem cells, which have the ability to either self-renew or undergo specialization or differentiation into multiple tissues. Continue reading ...

Natural resistance gene against spruce budworm found


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A natural resistance gene against spruce budworm in the white spruce has been discovered. The breakthrough paves the way to identifying and selecting naturally resistant trees to replant forests devastated by the destructive pest. Continue reading ...

Polyethylene mulch, glazing create optimal conditions for soil solarization


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers raised soil temperatures in high tunnels in southern Arizona to determine the efficacy of soil solarization using clear mulch on the soil surface and with tunnel glazing or with no glazing. Outcomes showed that producers using high tunnels in the region can complete solarization in less than a week during summer when the soil is fallow using glazing on the high tunnel and polyethylene mulch on the soil surface. Continue reading ...

Vermicompost leachate improves tomato seedling growth


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A study assessed growth performance of tomato seedlings treated with vermicompost-leachate (VCL), an organic liquid produced from earthworm-digested material. Seedlings were subjected to various temperature and watering regimes. Results showed that VCL can be a suitable soil amendment product to improve overall soil fertility and growth of tomato plants, even under temperature and water stress conditions. Continue reading ...

Trouble with your boss? Own it


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Don't get along with your boss? Your job performance may actually improve if the two of you can come to grips with the poor relationship. "Seeing eye-to-eye about the employee-supervisor relationship is equally, if not more important than the actual quality of the relationship," said the lead investigator on the study. Continue reading ...

Update on new treatments for liver diseases


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease are two serious liver conditions with limited pharmacological treatments. The December issues of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Gastroenterology highlights important updates into treatments for these two debilitating diseases. Continue reading ...

Type 2 diabetes: Added benefit of canagliflozin plus metformin is not proven


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

As in the first dossier assessment of canagliflozin, the drug manufacturer provided no suitable data for the fixed combination with metformin either. Therefore, no added benefit of canagliflozin plus metformin has been demonstrated for type 2 diabetes care. Continue reading ...

When shareholders exacerbate their own banks’ crisis


November 21st, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Banks are increasingly issuing 'CoCo' bonds to boost the levels of equity they hold. In a crisis situation, bondholders are forced to convert these bonds into a bank's equity. To date, such bonds have been regarded only as a means of averting a crisis. A study by German economists now shows that if such bonds are badly constructed, they worsen a crisis instead of stabilizing the banking system. Continue reading ...