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Changing to BST: Will the clock change affect your kids?

Research is underway to determine how clock changes affect children's sleep patterns. Continue reading ...

Scientists make new discovery about bird evolution

A team of scientists has described the most exceptionally preserved fossil bird discovered to date, in a newly published article. The new specimen from the rich Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota (approximately 131 to 120 million years old) is referred to as Eoconfuciusornis, the oldest and most primitive member of the Confuciusornithiformes, a group of early birds characterized by the first occurrence of an avian beak. Continue reading ...

An increasing proportion of women who are 60 years of age and older are drinking

Most older Americans drink alcohol. Given that this segment of the population is projected to almost double by 2050, reaching 112 million, in the future, there will likely be many more older drinkers in the United States than currently. Importantly, older individuals are more sensitive to alcohol’s effects than their younger counterparts, and are also more likely to take prescription medications that can interact negatively with alcohol, potentially leading to falls and other injuries. This study examined trends in drinking status among U.S. adults 60 years of age and older. Continue reading ...

UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S. Continue reading ...

New gene discovered associated with Tau, a common form of brain pathology

Investigators have reported the discovery of a new gene that is associated with susceptibility to a common form of brain pathology called Tau that accumulates in several different conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, certain forms of dementia and Parkinsonian syndromes as well as chronic traumatic encephalopathy that occurs with repeated head injuries. Continue reading ...

Biodiversity loss shifts flowering phenology at same magnitude as global warming

Researchers have revealed that declining plant diversity -- from habitat loss, human use, and other environmental pressures -- causes plants to flower earlier, and that the effects of diversity loss on the timing of flowering are similar in magnitude to the effects of global warming. The finding could have a powerful influence on the way scientists study ecosystem changes and measure the effects of global warming. Continue reading ...

Trump administration approves Keystone XL pipeline

The State Department says the project, blocked by Barack Obama, is in the national interest. Continue reading ...

Moderate drinking linked to lower risk of some — but not all — heart conditions

Moderate drinking is associated with a lower risk of several, but not all, cardiovascular diseases, finds a large study of UK adults. The finding that moderate drinking is not universally associated with a lower risk of all cardiovascular conditions suggests a more nuanced approach to the role of alcohol in prevention of cardiovascular disease is necessary. Continue reading ...

Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.   Continue reading ...

Robotic barman pours Rory a pint

The BBC’s technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones gets a beer poured for him by a robotic barman - but how long does it take? Continue reading ...

Neurosurgical practices must evolve and transform to adapt to rapidly changing healthcare industry

Neurosurgeons hoping to successfully navigate the rapidly changing healthcare industry must advance their strategies and adapt new ways of thinking in order to continue to thrive in an evolving environment, say authors of a new report. Continue reading ...

The Foehn feeling

For centuries, people in the Alps have attributed health issues, headaches in particular, to the mountain wind known as the Foehn. Continue reading ...

Dinosaur Phylogenetic Tree Shake-Up

An analysis of 74 dinosaur species leads a group of researchers to reorganize the extinct animals’ evolutionary history. Continue reading ...

Week in Review: March 20?24

What proposed budget cuts could mean for NIH; how astrocytes help control circadian behaviors in mice; how mutations confer virulence to vaccine-derived polio; why cancer risk is in part “random” Continue reading ...

Inactive teens develop lazy bones

Inactive teens have weaker bones than those who are physically active, according to a new study. Continue reading ...

Amazingly fast, cheap genome sequencing: Zika virus mosquito genome assembled from scratch

A team of scientists has developed a new way to sequence genomes, which can assemble the genome of an organism, entirely from scratch, dramatically cheaper and faster. Continue reading ...

In a sample of blood, researchers probe for cancer clues

One day, patients may be able to monitor their body's response to cancer therapy just by having their blood drawn. A new study has taken an important step in that direction by measuring a panel of cancer proteins in rare, individual tumor cells that float in the blood. Continue reading ...

Seven months after Rio Olympics, Zika continues to plague babies in urban slums

The near-paranoia related to Zika leading up to the 2016 Rio Games could have been avoided by heeding the lessons of previous epidemics, argues a new study. Continue reading ...

Astronomers identify purest, most massive brown dwarf

Astronomers have identified a record breaking brown dwarf (a star too small for nuclear fusion) with the 'purest' composition and the highest mass yet known. The object, known as SDSS J0104+1535, is a member of the so-called halo -- the outermost reaches -- of our galaxy, made up of the most ancient stars. Continue reading ...

Evolutionary advantage of the common periwinkle

A special kind of small sulfur-rich proteins, the metallothioneins, have an extraordinarily large capability for binding heavy metals. An international team of scientists has now discovered that the marine common periwinkle, which is widely considered a delicacy, contains the largest version of the protein found yet, with one additional cadmium-binding domain and a one-third higher detoxification capacity. This feature may help the snail survive in heavy-metal-polluted environments. Continue reading ...

Lighting up antibiotic resistance

Carbapenems are among the 'antibiotics of last resort' and can fight infections for which other drugs have long lost their effectiveness. However, even carbapenem-resistant pathogenic strains have emerged over the last decades. Continue reading ...

Successful method to reduce dental implant failure

Scientists are evaluating the effectiveness of a new nanocoating for dental implants to reduce the risk of peri-implantitis. Continue reading ...

On the trail of Parkinson’s disease

The molecular causes of diseases such as Parkinson's need to be understood as a first step towards combating them. Chemists recently succeeded in analyzing what happens when selective mutations of the alpha-synuclein protein occur -- a protein that is closely linked to Parkinson's disease. Continue reading ...

Severe psoriasis predominantly affects men

The fact that men are overrepresented in psoriasis registers and consume more psoriasis care have long led researchers to believe that the common skin disease disproportionately affects men. A unique study with 5,438 Swedish psoriasis patients now reveals that women have a statistically significant lower incidence of severe psoriasis compared to men. Continue reading ...

Hydrophobic proteins on virus surfaces can help purify vaccines

Through experimental and computational tests, new research expands on the theory of virus surface hydrophobicity. By being slightly water-repellent, the outer layers of proteins in virus capsids affect how it interacts with cells and the environment. Understanding this more can improve vaccine production and virus detection. Continue reading ...

Google and Symantec clash on website security checks

Web browsers could be blocked from accessing sites caught up in a row over basic security tools. Continue reading ...

Artificial photosynthesis steps into the light

A new project aims to create an efficient, simple-to-manufacture oxygen-evolution catalyst that pairs well with semiconductors for advanced solar cells. The technique could lead to unique catalysts for other applications. Continue reading ...

An algorithm that knows when you’ll get bored with your favorite mobile game

Researchers have developed a new algorithm that predicts when a user will leave a mobile game. This information is useful for game studios so that they can design strategies to maintain the player's interest. Continue reading ...

Computer program developed to diagnose and locate cancer from a blood sample

Researchers in the United States have developed a computer program that can simultaneously detect cancer and identify where in the body the cancer is located, from a patient's blood sample. Continue reading ...

‘Devastating’ coral loss in South China Sea – scientists

Researchers are warning of a "devastating" loss of coral at the Dongsha Atoll in the South China Sea. Continue reading ...