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Hundreds of thousands of dead fish wash up in New Jersey

Hundreds of thousands of fish, commonly known as peanut bunker fish, have washed up dead in a New Jersey creek. Continue reading ...

Poor security ‘aided’ Ashley Madison hack

The Ashley Madison dating site had "inadequate" security systems and used fake icons to make people think it was safe, reveals a report. Continue reading ...

New approach to determining how atoms are arranged in materials

Researchers have developed a novel approach to characterizing how atoms are arranged in materials, using Bayesian statistical methods to glean new insights into the structure of materials. The work should inform the development of new materials for use in a variety of applications. Continue reading ...

Wikileaks criticised on sensitive data

Wikileaks has been criticised for not doing enough to screen sensitive information found in documents released via the site. Continue reading ...

Rising temperatures could accelerate radiation induced DNA effects in marine mussels

Increased sea temperatures could have a dramatic effect on radiation-induced damage in marine invertebrates, a new study suggests. Continue reading ...

Image of the Day: Vigilant Sleeper

Eastern pygmy possums (Cercartetus nanus) can sense potential threats even when they're asleep, scientists show. Continue reading ...

New insights into the relationship between erosion and tectonics in the Himalayas

Earth's climate interacts with so called surface processes -- such as landslides or river erosion -- and tectonics to shape the landscape that we see. In some regions, the sheer force of these processes has led scientists to believe that they may even influence the development of tectonics. Scientists have now disproved this assumption. Continue reading ...

Most nations lack ability to deal with invasive species

Most countries in the world have little capacity to deal effectively with invasive species, a study suggests. Continue reading ...

Are you rubbish at recycling?

There has been a massive spike in the amount of recycling that gets rejected. Continue reading ...

Buses battle it out on test track

BBC News visits an annual bus competition designed to test handling and fuel efficiency, which helps a UK bus group choose the next generation of vehicles. Continue reading ...

Expecting the worst increases side-effects in breast cancer patients on hormone therapies

A study of women receiving hormone therapies such as tamoxifen as part of their treatment for breast cancer has found that the number and seriousness of side effects they experienced were influenced by their expectations. The study found that women who had higher expectations of suffering more and worse side-effects before their treatment began did, in fact, experience more after two years of adjuvant hormone therapy. Continue reading ...

New badger culling trials given go ahead across England

Badger culls are to be carried out in five new areas of England in a bid to control bovine TB, the BBC learns. Continue reading ...

Epidemiologist Who Helped Eradicate Smallpox Dies

Donald Henderson, who led the World Health Organization’s fight against the disease in the 1960s and ’70s, has passed away at age 87. Continue reading ...

Who’s bugging you?

After the New Zealand rugby team discover a listening device in their Sydney hotel meeting room, we examine just how much spying technology has advanced in recent years. Continue reading ...

Can political apps send more young people to the polls?

Will smartphone apps encourage more young people to go to the polls?Tinder for Politics/ Can apps encourage young people to vote? Continue reading ...

‘Cyclops’ beetles hint at solution to ‘chicken-and-egg’ problem in novel trait evolution

Beetles with cyclops eyes have given scientists insight into how new traits may evolve through the recruitment of existing genes -- even if these genes are already carrying out critical functions. Continue reading ...

New microchip demonstrates efficiency and scalable design

The Piton chip's architecture is scalable; designs can be built which go from a dozen processing units (called cores) to several thousand. Continue reading ...

Plan to Fight Zika with GM Mosquitos in Florida Faces Opposition

Officials postpone the launch of an experimental program aimed at reducing local mosquito populations with genetically modified insects. Continue reading ...

Ancient air pockets changing the history of Earth’s oxygen

Geologists are using new direct methods to measure the Earth's oxygenation. They identified, for the first time, exactly how much oxygen was in Earth's atmosphere 813 million years ago -- 10.9 percent. This finding, they say, demonstrates that oxygenation on Earth occurred 300 million years earlier than previously concluded from indirect measurements. Continue reading ...

Better understanding seismic hazards

The April 2015 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal killed more than 8,000 people and injured more than 21,000. With a magnitude of 7.8, it was the worst natural disaster to strike Nepal since the 1934 Nepal-Bihar earthquake. Researchers have now discovered complex relationship between major earthquake faulting and mountain building in the Himalayas. Continue reading ...

Pfizer to Buy Medivation for $14 Billion

The pharma giant is purchasing the San Francisco–based cancer drugmaker to boost its oncology portfolio. Continue reading ...

How a Sleep-Associated Hormone Affects Murine Tooth Development

Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups. Continue reading ...

Chimpanzees choose cooperation over competition

Tasks that require chimpanzees to work together preferred five-fold, despite opportunities for competition, aggression and freeloading. Continue reading ...

Light and matter merge in quantum coupling

Physicists probe the boundaries of light-matter interactions as they bridge traditional condensed matter physics and cavity-based quantum optics. Continue reading ...

Soluble corn fiber can help young women build bone, and older women preserve bone

Supplementing with soluble corn fiber at two critical times in a woman's life -- adolescence and post-menopause -- can help build and retain calcium in bone, according to new research. Continue reading ...

Antibiotic Therapy During Infancy Increases Type 1 Diabetes Risk in Mice

Three therapeutic doses administered during early life disturb the animals’ microbiomes and lead to enduring changes in the immune systems of non-obese diabetic mice, researchers report. Continue reading ...

In the ocean, clever camouflage beats super sight

Some fish blend seamlessly into their watery surroundings with help from their silvery reflective skin. Researchers have long assumed that squid, shrimp and other ocean animals could see through this disguise, thanks to an ability to detect a property of light -- called polarization -- that humans can't see. But a new study finds that not even polarization vision helps animals spot silvery fish from afar. Continue reading ...

Novel molecular clues behind nocturnal behavior

Scientists offer new insights into why many animals sleep at night and are active during the day, while others do the reverse. Continue reading ...

The science of diffusion and the spread of public policy

Scientists merged the domains of health policy with network science and dynamical systems to help understand the mechanisms of policy diffusion in the same way we understand the diffusion of one substance into another. Continue reading ...

Infants develop early understanding of social nature of food

A new study finds infants develop expectations about what people prefer to eat, providing early evidence of the social nature through which humans understand food. Continue reading ...