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Man guilty of Salmond Twitter abuse


August 29th, 2014         by BBC News - Technology

A man has been convicted of behaving in a threatening or abusive manner towards First Minister Alex Salmond on Twitter. Continue reading ...

Week in Review: August 25?29


August 29th, 2014         by The Scientist RSS

Sequencing the Ebola outbreak; optogenetic memory manipulation; monitoring post-publication peer review; yeast-based opioid production; even more ENCODE Continue reading ...

Image of the Day: Friendly Neighbors?


August 29th, 2014         by The Scientist RSS

These comma-shape bacteria (Vibrio tasmaniensis) cultured from sand produce iron compounds that promote the growth of other bacteria. Continue reading ...

Robot printer ‘comes to your desk’


August 29th, 2014         by BBC News - Technology

Fuji Xerox develops robotic printer that can move around a lounge or office to bring documents to the person who printed them. Continue reading ...

VIDEO: Tech review: This week’s headlines


August 29th, 2014         by BBC News - Technology

A camera harness for dogs from GoPro, plus other tech news. Continue reading ...

2.6m historic pictures posted online


August 29th, 2014         by BBC News - Technology

An academic is posting millions of historic photos and illustrations to Flickr where they can be searched and copied without charge. Continue reading ...

GCHQ protest over surveillance case


August 29th, 2014         by BBC News - Technology

The first of three days of protest by online activists is due to take place at the UK Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ). Continue reading ...

UN seeks climate change ‘Malala’


August 29th, 2014         by BBC News - Science & Environment

Five hundred people will learn tomorrow if they have won the chance to vent their frustration at world leaders over the global citizens stalemate over climate policy. Continue reading ...

Walking Fish Model Evolution


August 28th, 2014         by The Scientist RSS

Raising a semi-terrestrial species on land highlights the role of developmental plasticity in the evolutionary transition from water to land. Continue reading ...

The universal ‘anger face’: Each element makes you look physically stronger and more formidable


August 28th, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Each element of the anger face makes the person expressing it appear physically stronger and more formidable. Continue reading ...

Google trials drone deliveries


August 28th, 2014         by BBC News - Technology

Google reveals it has built and tested its own drones as part of a plan to make automated deliveries to remote homes as well as disaster-hit zones. Continue reading ...

Surgery Studies Rarely Use Females


August 28th, 2014         by The Scientist RSS

An analysis of papers published in several surgical journals reveals an overwhelming reliance on male subjects and male-derived cells. Continue reading ...

NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope witnesses asteroid smashup


August 28th, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has spotted an eruption of dust around a young star, possibly the result of a smashup between large asteroids. This type of collision can eventually lead to the formation of planets. Continue reading ...

Flapping baby birds give clues to origin of flight


August 28th, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The origin of flight is a contentious issue: some argue that tree-climbing dinosaurs learned to fly in order to avoid hard falls. Others favor the story that theropod dinosaurs ran along the ground and pumped their forelimbs to gain lift, eventually talking off. New evidence showing the early development of aerial righting in birds favors the tree-dweller hypothesis. Continue reading ...

VIDEO: Scientists trial knotweed killers


August 28th, 2014         by BBC News - Science & Environment

Swansea University scientists are conducting the largest field trial in Europe to find new ways of killing Japanese knotweed. Continue reading ...

Ebola Outbreak Strains Sequenced


August 28th, 2014         by The Scientist RSS

Ninety-nine publicly available genomes could help researchers working to develop diagnostics, vaccines, and therapies.  Continue reading ...

DNA tells story of Arctic peopling


August 28th, 2014         by BBC News - Science & Environment

A study of genetic sequences sheds light on the settling of the North American Arctic, from ancient "Paleo-Eskimos" to the modern-day Inuit. Continue reading ...

Has the humble password had its day?


August 28th, 2014         by BBC News - Technology

What new techs can reliably establish our identities? Continue reading ...

Second-hand e-cig smoke compared to regular cigarette smoke


August 28th, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Second-hand e-cig smoke has 10 times less particulate matter than regular cigarette smoke; but higher levels of certain toxic metals, a new study finds. Continue reading ...

How the zebrafish gets its stripes: Uncovering how beautiful color patterns can develop in animals


August 28th, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The zebrafish, a small fresh water fish, owes its name to a striking pattern of blue stripes alternating with golden stripes. Three major pigment cell types, black cells, reflective silvery cells, and yellow cells emerge during growth in the skin of the tiny juvenile fish and arrange as a multi-layered mosaic to compose the characteristic color pattern. While it was known that all three cell types have to interact to form proper stripes, the embryonic origin of the pigment cells that develop the stripes of the adult fish has remained a mystery up to now. Scientists have now discovered how these cells arise and behave to form the 'zebra' pattern. Continue reading ...

Prehistoric migrations: DNA study unravels the settlement history of the New World Arctic


August 28th, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new DNA study unravels the settlement history of the New World Arctic. We know people have lived in the New World Arctic for about 5,000 years. Archaeological evidence clearly shows that a variety of cultures survived the harsh climate in Alaska, Canada and Greenland for thousands of years. Despite this, there are several unanswered questions about these people. Continue reading ...

Home is where the microbes are


August 28th, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A person's home is their castle, and they populate it with their own subjects: millions and millions of bacteria. Scientists have detailed the microbes that live in houses and apartments. The results shed light on the complicated interaction between humans and the microbes that live on and around us. Mounting evidence suggests that these microscopic, teeming communities play a role in human health and disease treatment and transmission. Continue reading ...

New research reveals how wild rabbits were genetically transformed into tame rabbits


August 28th, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The genetic changes that transformed wild animals into domesticated forms have long been a mystery. An international team of scientists has now made a breakthrough by showing that many genes controlling the development of the brain and the nervous system were particularly important for rabbit domestication. The study gives answers to many genetic questions. Continue reading ...

Electric current to brain boosts memory: May help treat memory disorders from stroke, Alzheimer’s, brain injury


August 28th, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stimulating a region in the brain via non-invasive delivery of electrical current using magnetic pulses, called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, improves memory. The discovery opens a new field of possibilities for treating memory impairments caused by conditions such as stroke, early-stage Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury, cardiac arrest and the memory problems that occur in healthy aging. Continue reading ...

Astronomy: Radio telescopes settle controversy over distance to Pleiades


August 28th, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A worldwide network of radio telescopes measured the distance to the famous star cluster the Pleiades to an accuracy within 1 percent. The result resolved a controversy raised by a satellite's measurement that now is shown to be wrong. The incorrect measurement had challenged standard models of star formation and evolution. Continue reading ...

Genomic sequencing reveals mutations, insights into 2014 Ebola outbreak


August 28th, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In response to an ongoing, unprecedented outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa, a team of researchers has rapidly sequenced and analyzed more than 99 Ebola virus genomes. Their findings could have important implications for rapid field diagnostic tests. Continue reading ...

From bite site to brain: How rabies virus hijacks and speeds up transport in nerve cells


August 28th, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rabies is usually transmitted through the bite of an infected animal into muscle tissue of the new host. From there, the virus travels all the way to the brain where it multiplies and causes the usually fatal disease. A new article sheds light on how the virus hijacks the transport system in nerve cells to reach the brain with maximal speed and efficiency. Continue reading ...

Mystery solved: ‘Sailing stones’ of Death Valley seen in action for the first time


August 28th, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Racetrack Playa is home to an enduring Death Valley mystery. Littered across the surface of this dry lake, also called a "playa," are hundreds of rocks -- some weighing as much as 320 kilograms (700 pounds) -- that seem to have been dragged across the ground, leaving synchronized trails that can stretch for hundreds of meters. Continue reading ...

Genetic clues to spread of Ebola


August 28th, 2014         by BBC News - Science & Environment

Scientists have tracked the spread of Ebola in West Africa, revealing genetic clues to the course of the outbreak. Continue reading ...

Small molecule acts as on-off switch for nature’s antibiotic factory: Tells Streptomyces to either veg out or get busy


August 28th, 2014         by Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biochemists have identified the developmental on-off switch for Streptomyces, a group of soil microbes that produce more than two-thirds of the world's naturally derived antibiotic medicines. Their hope now would be to see whether it is possible to manipulate this switch to make nature's antibiotic factory more efficient. Continue reading ...