Instant Human - Just Add Coffee.
for sv - potpourri of thoughts Facebook Page

Enter a long URL to make tiny:

Customers ‘bewildered and fearful’ about use of their data

Nine in 10 people have no idea what companies do with the personal information the firms hold about them, says the Chartered Institute of Marketing. Continue reading ...

Customers ‘bewildered and fearful’ about use of their data

Nine in 10 people have no idea what companies do with the personal information the firms hold about them, says the Chartered Institute of Marketing. Continue reading ...

Sale of Kodi ‘fully-loaded’ streaming boxes faces legal test

A legal case concerning the sale of video-streaming set-top boxes on which subscription content can be accessed for free begins on Tuesday. Continue reading ...

‘People are dying’

The lucrative counterfeit drugs trade causes hundreds of thousands of deaths every year. Technology can help fight it, but are big pharma and governments doing enough? Continue reading ...

‘People are dying’

The lucrative counterfeit drugs trade causes hundreds of thousands of deaths every year. Technology can help fight it, but are big pharma and governments doing enough? Continue reading ...

Ig Nobels Honor Surprising Science

Studies on the sex lives of rats and the personality of rocks are among the projects celebrated this year. Continue reading ...

Water spotted spurting from Jupiter’s moon

Nasa says jets of water spotted spurting from Jupiter's moon, Europa, take them a step closer to finding out if there is life in space. Continue reading ...

Europa moon ‘spewing water jets’

Further evidence has been obtained to show that Jupiter's icy moon Europa throws jets of water out into space. Continue reading ...

Scientists’ finding supports moon creation hypothesis

A layer of iron and other elements deep underground is the evidence scientists have long been seeking to support the hypothesis that the moon was formed by a planetary object hitting the infant Earth some 4.5 billion years ago, a new study argues. Continue reading ...

New low-mass objects could help refine planetary evolution

When a star is young, it is often still surrounded by a primordial rotating disk of gas and dust, from which planets can form. Astronomers like to find such disks because they might be able to catch the star partway through the planet formation process, but it's highly unusual to find such disks around brown dwarfs or stars with very low masses. New work has discovered four new low-mass objects surrounded by disks. Continue reading ...

How cancer’s ‘invisibility cloak’ works

Researchers have discovered how cancer cells become invisible to the body's immune system, a crucial step that allows tumors to metastasize and spread throughout the body. Continue reading ...

Rapid adaptation of Aspergillus fungus presents doctors with a dilemma

The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is capable of rapid genetic adaptation in both natural environments and in humans according to a study. This presents doctors with a dilemma: prescribe medication that may increase drug resistance or not providing treatment and increase the likelihood of the fungus settling in the lungs? Continue reading ...

Exercise can increase levels of hunger-promoting endocannabinoids even if you are sleep-deprived

A research group has investigated how levels of endocannabinoids -- which target the same receptors as cannabis -- are affected by short sleep duration, and whether acute exercise can modulate this effect. Continue reading ...

X-rays that don’t come from any known source

Space is filled with types of light we can't see -- from infrared signals released by hot stars and galaxies, to the cosmic microwave background. Some of this invisible light that fills space takes the form of X-rays, the source of which has been hotly contended over the past few decades. A new study confirms some ideas about where these X-rays come from, shedding light on our solar neighborhood's early history. But it also reveals a new mystery -- an entire group of X-rays that don't come from any known source. Continue reading ...

Having a happy spouse could be good for your health

New research finds that having a happy spouse may be related to better health, at least among middle-aged and older adults. Continue reading ...

Gaps in data place thousands of illegally traded wild animals at risk, say researchers

The fate of over 64,000 live wild animals officially reported to have been confiscated by enforcement agencies remains untraceable, according to a new report. Between 2010 and 2014, more than 64,000 live wild animals were officially reported as seized by wildlife enforcement agencies according to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES) trade database. Continue reading ...

What happens when the brain is artificially stimulated?

Stimulating the brain via electricity or other means may help ease symptoms of various neurological and psychiatric disorders, with the method already used to treat conditions from epilepsy to depression. But what really happens when doctors zap the brain? Continue reading ...

Students in bilingual elementary school programs present worse academic results, according to study

Bilingual education programs, in which a substantial part of the teaching is done in a language different from the mother tongue and from the language of the students’ surroundings, have been fully established for years in countries such as India, Spain and the United States. In order to analyze the effects of these programs, these researchers evaluated the program that the Autonomous Community of Madrid introduced in a group of public primary schools in 2004. Continue reading ...

UTI testing technology cuts screening time to four hours

Researchers using DNA sequencing to profile antibiotic resistance in infection have achieved a turnaround time from 'sample to answer' of less than four hours for urinary tract infections (UTIs).  Continue reading ...

Start training for retirement as early as 50, research urges

The results of a project to establish European guidelines for preparing the population for life after full-time employment urge people to start planning as soon as 50. Continue reading ...

Custom-tailored strategy against glioblastomas

Glioblastomas are incurable malignant brain tumors. Usually the patients affected survive for only a few months. In addition, every tumor is quite different, which makes treatment very difficult. Researchers have now developed a completely new method as the basis for creating custom-tailored, two-stage therapies. Using tumor samples from a patient, they do lab tests to determine which substances can first make the different types of cancer cells uniform and then effectively kill them. Continue reading ...

A world first: Cardiovascular team carries out a new type of procedure on a heart valve

A team of heart surgeons and cardiologists used new catheter technology to repair a leaky tricuspid valve for the very first time. The Cardioband serves as an innovative and low-impact method of repairing leaky mitral valves in the left atrium of the heart. It offers a minimally invasive alternative to open heart surgery. Continue reading ...

How to merge two black holes in a simple way

The merger of two black holes, such as the one that produced the gravitational waves discovered by the LIGO Observatory, is considered an extremely complex process that can only be simulated by the world's most powerful supercomputers. However, two theoretical physicists have demonstrated that what occurs on the space-time boundary of the two merging objects can be explained using simple equations, at least when a giant black hole collides with a tiny black hole. Continue reading ...

How plants grow new lateral roots: New method uses 3D live imaging

Researchers have used 3D live imaging to observe the formation process of lateral roots in plants, and clarified part of the mechanism that creates new meristematic tissue. If the root formation mechanism in plants is revealed further, this could potentially be used to control plant growth by artificially altering root system architecture. Continue reading ...

Soil modeling to help curb climate change

Soil is a major carbon pool, whose impact on climate change is still not fully understood. According to a recent study, however, soil carbon stocks and could be modeled more accurately by factoring in the impacts of both soil nutrient status and soil composition. Determining the volume of carbon dioxide efflux from soil is important to enabling better choices in forest management with respect to curbing climate change. Continue reading ...

An algorithm for taxi sharing

Researchers in Uruguay have developed an evolutionary algorithm to allow a smart city to facilitate efficient taxi sharing to cut an individual's transport costs as well as reduce congestion and traffic pollution. Continue reading ...

Single photon light emitting diodes for on-chip integration

Researchers have used layered materials to create an all-electrical quantum light emitting diodes (LED) with single-photon emission. These LEDs have potential as on-chip photon sources in quantum information applications. Continue reading ...

Birth of politics in children: The case of dominance

As they grow up, do children become young Robin Hoods? Depending on their age, they do not allocate resources in the same way between dominant and subordinate individuals. Thus a tendency towards egalitarianism develops and becomes even stronger between the ages of 5 and 8 years. These findings provide a clearer understanding of how the notion of equality develops in human beings, and of their sense of justice. Continue reading ...

Women with hearing loss more likely to have preterm or low birth weight babies

The first study of birth outcomes in women with hearing loss finds significant differences when compared to women without hearing loss, scientists report. Continue reading ...

Ancestor of arthropods had the mouth of a penis worm

Imagine a meter long worm with 12 stubby legs and matching sets of flaps running down the body. On the head is a large pair of spiny appendages used for grasping prey that transport victims into a circular mouth with several rows of teeth. For years, scientists have disagreed over whether this mouth belonged to the Anomalocaris, the largest sea predator from the Cambrian Period, or was comparable to the penis worm, a subset of priapulids, a category of marine worms that were diverse in the Cambrian. Continue reading ...