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Ted 2017: Elon Musk’s vision for underground road system

Elon Musk talks about networks of tunnel roads, autonomous driving, space travel and his pet snail Gary. Continue reading ...

Trump executive order aims to allow Arctic drilling

The US president said he hoped the new order would create "thousands and thousands" of jobs. Continue reading ...

Plane in UK’s first double-drone near-miss case

The near-miss with a passenger jet is the first in the UK to involve more than one drone. Continue reading ...

Plague bacteria take refuge in amoebae

Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes bubonic plague, can survive within the ubiquitous soil protozoan, the amoeba, by producing proteins that protect against the latter microbe's digestion, report scientists. Continue reading ...

Finland’s oldest operating ferry given electric motor

The Fori passenger ferry will now use electric power to make its river crossings. Continue reading ...

Helpful tool allows physicians to more accurately predict parathyroid cancer recurrence

A newly-created prognostic tool reliably predicts the recurrence of parathyroid cancer, enabling physicians to identify patients at the highest risk. Consequently, the tool also helps to determine the optimum postoperative strategy, including aggressive surveillance and additional treatments, according to study results. Continue reading ...

Zika virus persists in the central nervous system and lymph nodes of rhesus monkeys

Zika virus can persist in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), lymph nodes and colorectal tissue of infected rhesus monkeys for weeks after the virus has been cleared from blood, urine and mucosal secretions, according to a study. Continue reading ...

Unexpected damage found rippling through promising exotic nanomaterials

Some of the most promising and puzzling phenomena in physics play out on the nanoscale, where a billionth-of-a-meter shift can make or break perfect electrical conductivity. Continue reading ...

First endoscopic stricturotomy with needle knife study for intestinal strictures in IBD

The first study illustrating the safety and efficacy of endoscopic needle-knife therapy for intestinal strictures in patients with inflammatory bowel disorder has been released by physicians. The results appear to be promising. Continue reading ...

Hubble’s bright shining lizard star

The bright object seen in this Hubble image is a single and little-studied star named TYC 3203-450-1, located in the constellation of Lacerta (The Lizard). The star is much closer than the much more distant galaxy. Continue reading ...

Scientists set record resolution for drawing at the one-nanometer length scale

Using a specialized electron microscope outfitted with a pattern generator, scientists turned an imaging instrument into a lithography tool that could be used to create and study materials with new properties. Continue reading ...

NatWest and RBS banking app fails

Customers complained on social media that payments and money transfers had not gone through. Continue reading ...

The swollen colon: Cause of chronic inflammation discovered

Too much of the oncogene Bcl-3 leads to chronic intestinal diseases, report investigators. They describe in a new report exactly how it throws the immune system off-balance. Continue reading ...

Antibiotics counteract the beneficial effect of whole grain

Antibiotics may impede the health properties of whole grain, especially for women, recent study demonstrates. The results emphasize the importance of maintaining a restrictive use of antibiotics. Continue reading ...

Further knowledge required about the differences between milk proteins

Recent years have witnessed significant debates on proteins in milk, in particular the differences between A1 and A2 proteins. However, there is still no scientific evidence to determine whether milk with one protein type is healthier than the other. Continue reading ...

New material inspired by a sea worm changes according to the environment

The gelatinous jaw of a sea worm, which becomes hard or flexible depending on the environment around it, has inspired researchers to develop a new material that can be applied to soft robotics. Despite having the texture of a gel, this compound is endowed with great mechanical resistance and consistency, and is able to adapt to changing environments. Continue reading ...

Study revises the development, evolutionary origin of the vertebrate brain

Researchers have made the first detailed map of the regions into which the brain of one of the most closely-related organisms to the vertebrates is divided and which could give us an idea of what our ancestor was like. Continue reading ...

Thin layers of water hold promise for the energy storage of the future

Researchers have found that a material which incorporates atomically thin layers of water is able to store and deliver energy much more quickly than the same material that doesn't include the water layers. The finding raises some interesting questions about the behavior of liquids when confined at this scale and holds promise for shaping future energy-storage technologies. Continue reading ...

DNA of extinct humans found in caves

The DNA of extinct humans can be retrieved from sediment in caves - even in the absences of skeletal remains. Continue reading ...

Mining: Bacteria with Midas touch for efficient gold processing

Special 'nugget-producing' bacteria may hold the key to more efficient processing of gold ore, mine tailings and recycled electronics, as well as aid in exploration for new deposits, research has shown. Continue reading ...

Weather extremes and trade policies were main drivers of wheat price peaks

Price peaks of wheat on the world market are mainly caused by production shocks such as induced for example by droughts, researchers found. These shocks get exacerbated by low storage levels as well as protective trade policies, the analysis of global data deriving from the US Department of Agriculture shows. In contrast to widespread assumptions, neither speculation across stock or commodity markets nor land-use for biofuel production were decisive for annual wheat price changes in the past four decades. Continue reading ...

No, complex is not complicated — it is rather simple

The simplest experimental system to date to identify the minimum requirements for the emergence of complexity has been developed. Continue reading ...

Fast, low energy, and continuous biofuel extraction from microalgae

Researchers have used a nanosecond pulsed electric field to extract hydrocarbons from microalgae. By using the shorter duration pulse, they were able to extract a large amount of hydrocarbons from the microalgae in a shorter amount of time, using less energy, and in a more efficient manner than current methods. Continue reading ...

Expert unravels disease that took the hearing of world-famos painter

Francisco Goya is the most important Spanish artist of the late 18th and early 19th century. In 1793, Goya, then 46, came down with a severe, undiagnosed illness. His hearing never returned. Now, a hearing expert has developed a diagnosis. She thinks Goya likely suffered from an autoimmune disease. Continue reading ...

Solar system: New insights into ring system

Astronomers have modeled the two rings around Chariklo, the smallest body in the Solar System known to have rings. This is the first time an entire ring system has been simulated using realistic sizes for the ring particles. The simulation revealed that the ring particles are much smaller than predicted or that an undiscovered shepherd satellite around Chariklo is stabilizing the ring. Continue reading ...

Success in the 3-D bioprinting of cartilage

A team of researchers has managed to generate cartilage tissue by printing stem cells using a 3-D-bioprinter. The fact that the stem cells survived being printed in this manner is a success in itself. In addition, the research team was able to influence the cells to multiply and differentiate to form chondrocytes (cartilage cells) in the printed structure. Continue reading ...

The world’s fastest film camera: When light practically stands still

Forget high-speed cameras capturing 100,000 images per second. A research group has developed a camera that can film at a rate equivalent to five trillion images per second, or events as short as 0.2 trillionths of a second. This is faster than has previously been possible. Continue reading ...

Unlikely pair of plants named after stars of movie ‘twins’

Biologists have named an unlikely pair of plants after Arnold Schwarzenegger and Danny DeVito, the stars of the 1988 movie Twins. Continue reading ...

Amazon ‘style assistant’ divides opinion

Amazon's new Echo Look device takes full length photos and offers advice on outfit choices. Continue reading ...

Follow-up colonoscopies associated with a significantly lower incidence of bowel cancer

Patients at risk of developing bowel cancer can significantly benefit from a follow-up colonoscopy, finds new research. Continue reading ...